Don’t forget we are talking about children

In a piece entitled “Living Abroad is My Way of Prolonging My Black Son’s Life” posted in the New York Times by Imani Bashir:

“I refused to attempt giving birth in the States because black women are three to four times more likely to die in pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum than their white counterparts. Black babies have an infant mortality rate that is higher than babies of any other race. I simply wanted us to stay alive, and I could not trust that to be the end result if I stayed in America.”

In conversation with a friend, “Do people look at your sons differently, when they hit a certain age? And at what age is that? I feel like people are so in love with Nasir right now, but I fear that this is going to change, I said to her. She told me that it changes around 10. That’s when you start to experience teachers claiming your child has behavioral problems, and when women start clutching their purses or walking briskly past to avoid contact with your precious boy.”

“In the United States, black children face harsher punishments and more frequent disciplinary actions against them than any other race in a school setting. Black children are 18 times more likely to be tried as an adult than white children are for similar crimes. And according to the American Psychology Association, black boys as young as 10 are viewed as older and less innocent than white boys.”

All children and families should be supported. All communities should pull together to bolster its a citizens for a better future. Black lives matter. This only the beginning. Every child deserves to feel safe and protected, no exceptions. We protest to fight systematic rascism.

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